LGBT people and public services

A good practice guide from Stonewall Scotland

End of module test

We hope that this resource has helped you develop a greater understanding of the ways in which the service user journey can be made more equal for LGBT people. To gauge that understanding please answer the following questions. You can take this test as many times as you like to help enhance your knowledge of the ways in which and even small steps to being more LGBT inclusive can make a big difference.


1. The Equality Act 2010 protects lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people from discrimination:

  • When applying for jobs
  • In employment
  • When using a service
  • All of the above

2. Joe is an excellent occupational therapist and well respected by colleagues and patients. He is working with James, a stroke patient, who is married to Kevin. Joe provides James with excellent clinical care, however as his religious beliefs do not support same-sex marriage he does not involve Kevin in discussions about care support, even though James indicated that he wanted Kevin to be involved. Is this an example of:

  • Direct discrimination
  • Indirect discrimination
  • Positive action
  • Person-centred care

Direct discrimination occurs when a person is treated unfavourably or less favourably because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity. Indirect discrimination occurs when a policy or way of doing things is applied to everyone, but has the purpose or effect of treating some groups of people (like lesbian women, gay men, bisexual people or trans people) less favourably than others.

3. Emma works in the records department. When Alfred calls to have his name changed from Alison to Alfred on his record, Emma responds that the policy does not allow changes of name for any reason other than marriage or divorce. Is this an example of:

  • Direct discrimination
  • Indirect discrimination
  • Positive action
  • Person-centred care

Direct discrimination occurs when a person is treated unfavourably or less favourably because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity. Indirect discrimination occurs when a policy or way of doing things is applied to everyone, but has the purpose or effect of treating some groups of people (like lesbian women, gay men, bisexual people or trans people) less favourably than others.

4. According to research conducted by Stonewall Scotland, how many LGBT people have experienced discrimination from a public service provider in the past three years?

  • One in six
  • One in four
  • One in eight

One in six LGBT people have experienced discrimination from a public service provider in the past three years.

Note: The next four questions are examples of practice taken from the videos and case studies. Would you characterise them as good or bad practice?

5. A lesbian patient in hospital is upset by the homophobic remarks directed at her by another patient. The doctor challenges the behaviour of the other patient.

  • Good practice
  • Bad practice

You might want to review the video clip in the introduction to the module.

6. The ward staff recognise that a patient’s partner is important to her recovery, and takes action to ensure she continues to be involved.

  • Good practice
  • Bad practice

You might want to review the video clip in the introduction to the module.

7. Becky, who is trans, is changing her name on her university records. The records staff seemed confused and did not know if the university policy permitted them to do this.

  • Good practice
  • Bad practice

You might want to review the video clip in final case study.

8. Becky, who is trans, had only been presenting herself as female in public for two months, and was nervous about going to the bank to establish her new account. The clerk was professional, asking only for relevant personal information and clearly explaining what would be required. Becky felt that she had been treated as any other customer would be.

  • Good practice
  • Bad practice

You might want to review the video clip in final case study.

Note: Which of the following might make LGB people feel more comfortable or less comfortable using a service?

9. Visual cues that the service is inclusive, including posters and information on LGBT issues.

  • More comfortable
  • Less comfortable

Consider your own experiences using a service. How do you know that the service is relevant for you? What makes you feel welcome?

10. Clear policy guidance on how you can expect to be treated by a service provider, and what rights you have should this not happen.

  • More comfortable
  • Less comfortable

When expectations are clear, do you find it easier to hold others to account?

11. Staff using inclusive language not making assumptions about your sexual orientation or gender identity.

  • More comfortable
  • Less comfortable

Can you think of a situation where someone made assumptions about you which weren’t true? How did that make you feel about the situation?

12. A gay man goes to his GP because he has been experiencing back pain. The GP checks his record and immediately asks when he last had an HIV test.

  • More comfortable
  • Less comfortable

Why is an HIV test relevant for someone with back pain? Does this reveal any assumptions the doctor is making about the patient?

Further reading >